Serving Never Stops

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One fourth-generation Marine uses his background to better serve his veterinary practice customers, as well as his community.

The Marine Corps and animal hospitals are two very different workplace environments. But Dan Flood, a business development strategist for MWI Animal Health, has been able to use the skills in one to help build a successful career in the other.

Having a military background often gives you a different perspective on problem-solving, personnel management and overall professionalism, Flood (on the right of the photo above) said. “I am thankful for the military experiences, as I feel it played a huge part in my professional development, which aids in my successes today.”

As a business development strategist, Flood oversees capital equipment sales, MWI financial programs, technology-based solutions, and new clinic build/remodels. “We work side by side with our territory managers and regional managers,” he said. “My role is dedicated to the growth and success within our clinics.”

Flood said he enjoys consulting with clinics to offer solutions while making them successful. “We cover a large geography, where I enjoy seeing how different clinics can operate in different parts of the country. Success comes with the synergy between all parties involved. Our recommendations and expertise carry a lot of weight, but it takes a team to be successful. Relationship skills and experience are two attributes you must have to obtain a healthy outcome.”

Not every clinic is the same. The challenges a business development strategist faces are anywhere from helping clinics grow their clientele to offering additional modalities to increase revenue, Flood said. “Ultimately, the end game is to make the client successful while we offer state-of-the-art tools to convey great medical care to the patient.”

Unique and Rewarding

Flood joined the Marine Corps when he was 17 years old, straight out of high school. It wasn’t a tough decision – Flood is a fourth-generation United States Marine. “Continuing our military legacy was always in the cards for me.”

While serving in the Marines, Flood had some unique and rewarding jobs. He served with combat engineers attached to the Marine Aircraft Group 41, helping with tasks such as setup, refueling, and coordinating with the ground/air task force. He eventually transitioned to a counter-terrorism unit stationed at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, which involved more behind-the-scenes work.

Flood got out of active duty service in 2003. He was able to obtain a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, Commerce. “A career in business was also a dream of mine,” he said. “I feel some of the most important lessons I can carry over to the civilian world are accountability and discipline.”

He got into the animal health industry in 2009 with scil animal care, running their diagnostics team for about four years before starting work for IDEXX as a veterinary systems consultant. In January 2014, he began work for MWI Animal Health.

Group photo of search and rescue team representative of community service

When a Need Arises

Though no longer active in the Marine Corps, Flood supports Marine veterans groups and speaks to young Marines who will soon transition out of the military.

The saying, “Once a Marine, always a Marine” stands true. Flood said he could never kick the itch of wanting to go back in, so he took his military experience to the private sector. When a need arises, or natural disaster makes landfall, Flood works with Shaffer Security Group to offer aid and executive protection for individuals (VIP) and organizations.

“This past hurricane in Texas, Harvey, did a number on our coastal towns,” he said. “When I got the call, I was able to take vacation time to go down and offer aid to our clients. Many times we made it in the disaster areas before DPS (Law Enforcement), so we were able to secure facilities and offer medical aid and support with other local teams. Harvey was a disaster, but my time and training in the Marines played a huge role in providing aid on the coast.”

As a veteran, Flood supports a number of organizations to ensure “no man is left behind” no matter the time, nor the branch they served in. “The two that are dear to me are American Valor Foundation, (The Kyle Family), and 22Kill. AVF is committed to supporting our military veterans, first responders and their families through programs of fundraising efforts and direct support. AVF also offers memorial scholarships to our heroes. 22KILL’s mission is to create a community that raises awareness and combats suicide by empowering veterans, first responders, and their families through traditional and non-traditional therapies. Their efforts of informing the world about veteran suicides are outstanding.”

Whether you served or not, everyone can contribute to those causes or ones like them, Flood said. “We should all support and take care of our veterans when they return home. It is our duty and responsibility.”

American Valor Foundation

American Valor Foundation is a registered and approved 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation committed to supporting military veterans, first responders and their families through programs of fundraising efforts and direct support to individuals. AVF also honors heroes through memorial scholarships. Visit: americanvalorfoundation.org

22Kill

22Kill’s mission is to create a community that raises awareness and combats suicide by empowering veterans, first responders, and their families through traditional and non-traditional therapies. Visit: 22kill.com